Tag Archives: Police

Mobile Phones,Driving and FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)

This edition of the blog is devoted to those who despite our best efforts at deterrent, and the constant media bombardment that tell them that their actions are potentially lethal; still persist in participating in what is becoming the most visible and public of all road traffic offences. I talk of course of the modern scourge of the road, the mobile phone user.

mobile phone

A person with FOMO  is the driver who lacks the ability, some may say intelligence or common sense to realise the possible result of their driving whilst using a phone. All because they just can’t stand being away from their mobile phone. 

Now this particular driver has no definable profile, as they come in all guises. You see them, I see them, everyone sees them, but still they don’t care. Their public show of offending may be an affront to the law abiding road user, but to them their interaction with the sacred device, social media or the person on the other end is far more important than someone’s life. I see one in every 15 or so vehicles whilst I walk my children to school, we have a carefully trained eye you see, and notice the tell-tale signs that show what appears to be a normal motorist to be the indiscriminate potential killer they really are.

First comes the young female, quickly checking Facebook to see if her mates are still hung-over from the night before, her phone just below steering wheel height, she looks up every now and then just to make sure nothing has appeared in front of her as she takes a ton of steel down the road at just above 30mph.

Then comes the middle aged businessman, phone glued to his right ear leaving just one hand free to control the car, it’s alright, it’s an auto, couldn’t figure out how to use the hands free in his all singing, all dancing executive mean machine you see, and he needs to rearrange the meeting he’s going too late for as the traffic’s just awful!.

Next comes the delivery driver tapping his next destination into his sat nav app. It does have to be combined with a moving vehicle of course to reach its full destructive capabilities.

Up next is the young male in his highly modified hot hatch, he’s had a text telling him where the next car meet is, don’t let on in case the Babylon find out it reads, be rude not to answer even though the Lollipop man has just stepped out into the road 50 yards away.

Look up, oh its all too late !

Look up, oh its all too late !

A few seconds later the harassed mother swerves her way up the road, phone trapped between head and shoulder she tries to steer with one hand whilst pushing little Johnny back into his car seat as the little angel has got free of the straps again, why stop and re-arrange the evening’s Zumba class and sort Johnny out when you can make progress all at the same time.

Traffic’s come to a standstill now, a driver quickly whips out the phone to check if that vibration was a missed message or call, as they look intently at their phone whilst stationary or rocking their vehicle back and forth on the clutch they miss the motorcyclist filtering, or the cyclist moving up the inside of them in the cycle lane. Both of which they hit as they pull away or turn left to take the “rat run” traffic-jam-avoiding next junction.

Closely follows little Miss Innocent, phone in the hand, clearly on display, talking away but it’s held against the steering wheel or the usual 6 to 12 inches away from the face, she’s not breaking the law, or so she would have you believe, it’s on speaker phone so she thinks she’s fine, it’s not the same she thinks, trouble is she doesn’t think, that’s the problem.

Last but not least comes the “sniper”, fast becoming the most common of the FOMO clan, the driver who appears to be paying full attention, they appear to be looking at the road but every now and then their face dips to their lap, not to admire their pristine lower office attire, but to check the phone placed in their lap. It’s hidden, no-one can see their offending, it’s guilt free, or so they think until it’s too late. You see inevitably they glance down at the wrong moment and the next thing they see is the face of the child they are about to hit on the crossing they didn’t notice.

I know I’ve left out the tradesman arranging his next quote, the skip wagon driver, the scooter rider stuffing the phone up the side of an unstrapped helmet but as we all know the list is endless, sadly never ending.

Is it worth someone's life ?

Is it worth someone’s life ?

What can be done?

The mobile phone user is no better than a drink driver. They take the same risk, gamble with their own and, more importantly, other road users’ lives for their own selfish needs. The impairment to driving has been proven to be equal to driving whilst over the limit or under the influence of cannabis, so why isn’t the punishment the same I hear you cry, well that’s not a matter for the likes of the police; we just catch them, some time and time again. Sentencing is a matter for politicians and courts, under pressure from the public, feel free to make your feelings known to those whose responsibility it is to change such things, the more that shout and protest, the more they listen. But they don’t need to be told how high the offending rate is, they like any of us just need to stand at the side of a busy road for 15 minutes and you will see all the usual FOMO drivers. Feel free to have the punishment debate on our Twitter account; we are always interested in your views.

Most who use a mobile whilst driving would not dream of drink driving, oh no that would be unthinkable, drink driving is criminal they would say, well so is driving whilst using a phone. The consequences of being caught are not the same to the offender; we need a culture change, the stigma associated with being a drink driver needs to become the same stigma we attach to the person with the disease known as FOMO.

If you see a FOMO driver just point at them, they don’t like the attention, nobody likes being pointed at, the more people that point the more attention is drawn to them, embarrassment is a great deterrent. Refuse to get into a car with someone who uses their phone whilst driving, or makes the preparatory act of placing it in their lap.

 

And for all those “snipers” out there who think they are getting away with it, the “prove it copper” brigade we will just prosecute you for driving a vehicle in a dangerous condition. We don’t have to prove your phone use, after all a phone in your lap is insecure, it could easily fall into the driver’s foot-well under normal vehicle movement, if it does the natural reaction is to hastily retrieve your £500 “sacred” device. As you bend down you’ll not have proper control, lose your view of the road, that’s if it doesn’t impair a pedal causing further loss of control. We’ve done it with taxi radios for years, your oversized smartphone is no different. For those who say that wouldn’t happen, try finding a magistrate who would disagree, we’ll see you in court.

The best thing to do with your phone, unless you have a dash cradle to put it in, is to put it in the boot, then it’s out of harm’s way, it will still Bluetooth to your car or hands free, so what are you losing, nothing apart from the temptation to answer. Just get over your FOMO, is that Tweet, Facebook post, Instagram, Snapchat (I could go on and on) really worth the life of an innocent road user?  

Just dying to see……

 

This blog is all about those things that detrimentally affect a road user’s vision and as a result endanger themselves and others. Your vision, your observations, your ability to see and then react to a potential hazard on the road is the start and most important part of everything you do on a journey, whether you are on foot, two wheels, four wheels or more. Yet some seem intent on compromising their own and others safety for what is usually a blindingly obvious obstruction to seeing what is around you on the road. Remember, unless you are blessed with some supernatural or superhero style power, you can only deal with what you see. If you fail to see another road user there is a high probability that you or they will suffer as a result….

Tints – the shaded killer

Okay let’s start with the obvious, tinted driving windows. These are great on bright sunny days and pose no obvious risk under such circumstances. However, as we can count how many such days we have here in the UK and not run out of fingers, and add to that we have something called “nightime” where the sun disappears to be replaced by the moon, you will start to see the problem. For those who still don’t get it, would you chose to drive wearing dark sunglasses all of the time in all conditions ?, try walking down the road in sunglasses at night, your reactions will range from discomforting to petrifying when you realise what you cannot see, imagine having that view out of your driving windows 24/7 !

Tinted drivers windows, a potential "killer" of vulnerable road users !

Tinted drivers windows, a potential “killer” of vulnerable road users !

The most worrying thing about tinted windows, as with any obstruction to a road user’s view of the road, is that it is the easily missed, less obvious road user that becomes the potential victim. The pedestrian in dark clothing, the poorly lit cyclist, the small child walking from a shaded area, the motorcyclist as you pull from a junction, these are the people that the wilful ignorance of those who drive with obstructions to their vision will hurt.

Windows down and the excuses!

Most realise there is a problem with their windows if they are tinted, having to wind the window down in order to get a view out of a wing mirror when reversing at night makes it very obvious that window tints can cause all sorts of problems in every day road use. When we stop those “car enthusiasts” in freezing weather or pouring rain and both driver windows are down before we get to speak to them !, we automatically know that they are hiding a potential killer of a defect from us, all for the sake of “blinging” their motor !. Then there are those who utter “But I bought it like this” or “they told me they were legal”. Really? How can anyone think a modification to a vehicle that a manufacturer doesn’t offer can possibly be legal, after all, the manufacturer’s exist to make money, if they could, they would. Whilst on the subject of modifications, window tinting is a modification that you will need to notify your insurer of, tinted drivers windows that are illegal will invalidate your insurance, and as you will find out as you read on, there really is no such thing as legal after- market tint that can be applied to driver’s windows. So as well as the potential 3 points you could get for your tints, you also come straight into play for another 6 points for a no insurance offence, ouch !

Spot the difference

Spot the difference

 

What is legal? How do we test? What will I get?

Right let’s start with what are my driving windows?

Well there’s the obvious one the windscreen, the other drivers windows are those situated in the driver and front passenger doors, quite simply, those in-front and adjacent to the driver. Imagine the windows on a transit style van; those are the very windows we are concerned with on your vehicle.

Now here’s why you cannot apply a legal tint to any driver’s window in the UK. Manufacturers of vehicles already tint the glass in vehicles to just below the legal limit, so they transmit enough light to comply. The law states that your windscreen must transmit 75% of the available light; your two side driver’s windows must transmit 70% of the available light. Manufacturer’s tint the glass at production so it transmits just over these amounts by a few percent, so soon as you add any post production tint, no matter how light it is, makes your drivers windows illegal and you liable to prosecution. Penalties for illegally tinted windows are on a sliding scale depending on the severity of the offending window tint. Between 100% and 70 % or 75% (depending on the window) your windows are legal and you skip away into the sunset singing a merry song, between 70 % and 50 % you’ll get a Vehicle Defect Rectification Notice ensuring you remove the tints within 14 days, between 50% and 30% you will get a £100 fine and will have to remove the tints at the roadside whilst grumbling somewhat. Get stopped with tints that only transmit between 30 % and 0 % of the available light and you’ll be earning 3 points, a £100 fine, or alternatively a day out at court. If you are wondering, most of the Tints we test are usually below 30%. Oh and yes you will be removing the tints at the roadside leaving a sticky mess all over your windows whilst thanking the officer for bringing the matter to your attention. The worst case scenario is you are involved in a collision resulting in someone being seriously injured or even dying and your illegally tinted windows are found to be a contributory factor, you will then face a prison sentence as your vehicle was in a dangerous condition, and knowingly driving a vehicle in a dangerous condition is dangerous driving. Oh and if you refuse to remove your tints at the roadside we will prohibit your vehicle from being driven due to its dangerous condition by way of a PG9 prohibition notice.

How we detect?

We have calibrated eyes that detect tinted windows, it happens during the Traffic Patrol Officers course when we get a bionic implant. Aside from that, it’s really is obvious, illegally tinted windows look considerably darker than legal windows. Once stopped we test the windows using one of two calibrated devices that measure the transmission of light through glass, a “TINTMAN” or a “TINT TESTER”. Both give a transmission of light figure that we then use in any prosecution should your windows prove to be illegal.

 

Tints tested for freeeeeeeee !

Now you just may be in a mild state of panic regards the state of your driving windows having read the last few paragraphs so here’s what you can do to avoid prosecution. Firstly if you have an after-market tint on your driving windows just remove them, a quick search on the internet and you will find some sound advice on how to remove the tinting and clean you windows after to avoid the glue residue smearing on your window seals etc. If your still unsure if your windows are illegally tinted after reading all of the above then why not pop down to our “Get you windows tested” events we will be running via our Twitter account, and have them tested without fear of prosecution. Just be aware though if they are illegal, you will not be driving away with them in place or else you will be prosecuted! (So bring some cleaning gear if you fear the worst!)

Testing in action

Testing in action

The first of these events will be at the Halfords Store, Coventry Road, Sheldon, Birmingham on Saturday 25th April from 5pm to 7pm, you’ll spot the marked car on the car park. Keep an eye on our Twitter feed for future dates and locations, we will get around the whole of the force over the coming month giving everyone ample opportunity to avoid a potential prosecution.

 

Visor Vision

Whenever I ride a motorcycle I always feel like my eyes are on stalks anyway such is the level of intense concentration I give my observations, which is no doubt enhanced by the sense of extreme vulnerability that only riding a motorcycle can give. So why some insist on wearing tinted visors in poor light conditions is beyond me. If you are going to have a tinted visor for bright light conditions always carry an untinted visor so you can swap. Penalties for visor offences are as follows  

But inevitably the highest price you will pay as a motorcyclist when you miss something is paying with your life, just carry a clear visor for when light conditions deteriorate.

The Pedestrian Menace

Pedestrians you are road users, as such you need to look where you’re going, not at your phone! All too often pedestrians are walking out into the road or using crossings whilst looking at their phone instead of what’s coming down the road towards them. There isn’t an app yet that tells you if it’s safe to cross, so look up from your phone and give it your full attention. Remember cyclists are silent on approach until the point you step out in front of them. Then we tend to become quite vocal, not always in a pleasant manner, that’s if it’s not too late! So please remember the “Stop, Look, Listen”. Save the phone based activities for when you’re seated in your favourite coffee house.

 

Flowers, Sat Navs, Trinkets and the just plain ridiculous!

Now I’m no Percy Thrower or Alan Titchmarsh but even I know that flowers belong in two places, in the ground or in a vase, but certainly not hanging from your rear view mirror or the like, so they sit in the driver’s vision. VW drivers take note, if you must have them why not wear them round your neck and spread a little love and happiness, instead of giving yourself chance of missing that vulnerable road user and spreading misery and pain as a result !, It’s just not flowers, we see all manner of trinkets and paraphernalia dangling in-front of drivers views, they may not obstruct your immediate view ahead but your peripheral vision to the left and your view into junctions as you turn left ends up having a blind spot which due to perspective can be over 20 feet wide at a distance you’ll reach in seconds at 30 or 40 mph, there could be a crossing child in that blind spot !

Flowers are for the ground or vases not your windscreen !

Flowers are for the ground or vases not your windscreen !

The golden rule is keep the swept area of your windscreen and views to the side through the driver’s side windows clear of any obstruction to view. So don’t stick you Sat Nav in the swept area of your windscreen, or your phone or anything else for that matter. Again it may only be inches wide on your screen, but in the distance it’s hiding a space that is feet wide, what’s in that space? You really need to know to ensure your own and everyone else’s safety.

Onto the plain ridiculous, we once stopped a driver with a two foot teddy sitting on the dash, you could say childlike behaviour, but I know my kids have got more common sense than that, sheer idiocy is more befitting. And then there was the HGV driver with more collected ornaments and trinkets on his dash and stuck to his windscreen than my Nan had in her china cabinet, its only 44 tonnes at 56mph, what could possibly go wrong if he missed something! I’m sure you’ve seen similar, that’s the great thing about road traffic law, we’re all out there on the regions roads experiencing this sort of stupidity daily, feel free to share your little gems on our Twitter account, we’re always interested in the sublime and ridiculous, oh and donuts we’re very interested in those as well 😉 ………..safe journeys all.

Seatbelt Selfishness

Seatbelt Stupidity ……..

Many whispered words of derision leave the lips of traffic officers when it comes to those who commit seatbelt offences. It’s an offence that seems never to go away, but with such a simple thing that is so capable of saving your life, why don’t people wear them, bravado ?, nothing brave about being so selfish (those non wearers who don’t wear a belt and feel aggrieved at being called selfish read on before smashing 140 characters into our Twitter account). Maybe forgetfulness , I don’t think so, most have never known anything else, after all these years of seatbelt laws it should be enshrined in any driver by now, even for those who can remember when it wasn’t law to have belts or wear one in a vehicle. Technology means most vehicles have an audible or visual alert that warns you of a momentary lapse into forgetfulness, and reminds you to belt up. Our fleet of BMW’s and Audi’s, have an almost berating tone that is heard at the conclusion of every pursuit as we unclip before becoming stationary in readiness for the inevitable 100 yard dash.

Even your car will remind you !

Even your car will remind you !

The tone is that stern, if non- compliance continues a semi catatonic state could be induced rendering you useless to drive anyway, but that’s German cars for you; always want to be in charge. To get to the point, not wearing a belt is like going out the house without any shoes on, you don’t forget, you choose. For those who say “I don’t want to be trapped by my belt in a collision” remember this, myself and my colleagues collectively, have unfortunately, seen hundreds of people die because they were not wearing a belt, we have never been to a fatal collision that was caused by someone wearing a belt. There will be a few who will utter” I can’t wear it because of a medical condition, I can’t reach round to get it” or the one that’s becoming ever common “I’m to big to wear it”, yes we do get them ! Well unless you’ve got a seatbelt exemption certificate from your doctor you have to wear it. More importantly if you can’t wear a belt for whatever reason, have you informed your insurer ? Thought not ! Insurer’s don’t like people who don’t wear belts, they are high risk. If you do survive a collision when you were not wearing a seatbelt please don’t lie to us and tell us you were wearing a belt, we can check if a belt has been worn in seconds by examining the belt and checking for the resulting marks on your chest, but it’s usually a lot easier than that because you will have left a bulls eye on the windscreen with an accompanying DNA sample,! It’s impossible to head butt a windscreen with a seatbelt on, please don’t try it, but trust us it can’t be done.

Do not try this at home !

Do not try this at home !

The offence itself comes in many forms, firstly there is the plain not worn, its hanging limply at the B post like a flag on the stillest of days. Then there is the incorrectly or part worn, those with it tucked under the arm instead of across the shoulder, those with the lap strap on but the across the body strap behind them. In order to not commit an offence a belt has to be worn in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, and an incorrectly worn belt can injure or worsen injuries even in a minor collision, where as a correctly worn belt would leave just a few aches and pains. Lastly there’s my particular favourite, the clipped up behind, those who clip up their belt and sit on the lot, in the misbelief that it fools us into thinking they are wearing it, not so, we can spot the tell-tale signs! This is the common offence of the “PlayStation driver” who thinks they are as safe on the road as they are in their gaming chair at home! They have the driving skills to match their inept thinking as well, which is why catastrophic results are usually guaranteed.

Such a simple thing saves so many lives.

Such a simple thing saves so many lives.

Injuries are pretty horrific. Not wearing a belt or wearing it incorrectly leaves you free to move about inside a metal box at great speed with a choice of metal, glass or plastic to cushion the inevitable post collision blow. There will be those who are now shouting “what about the airbags? surely they will save you” . Well no, because all airbags in UK cars are designed to work in conjunction with seatbelts, and seeing as they deploy at nearly 200mph they will just smash you into another part of the vehicle interior if a belt isn’t worn. Without a belt to slow you on impact the bag won’t have fully deployed before you come into contact with a part of the vehicles interior that is far more substantial than your head ! This is why so many fatalities in vehicle born collisions are due to head injuries, all down to a simple seatbelt offence.

Notice I haven’t mentioned going through the windscreen, that’s because modern screens are that strong you don’t usually go through anymore, more half through now, with your upper torso on the bonnet and your twisted legs trapped behind the wheel, ending up like a macabre bonnet trophy. Then there’s the complete ejection, usually through the rear screen or side windows. Now a complete ejection leaves two usual consequences, firstly if the car is rolling, bad luck, fate or the intervention of our old friend the Reaper means it rolls over the unfortunate ejectee; secondly the ejectee is fired out of the vehicle into a live lane at the mercy of the traffic. Do remember if you don’t wear a belt, you are basically agreeing that in the event of being a participant in a vehicle born collision that would normally be survivable, you are quite willing to forfeit your existence for the sake of not clipping up, and it happens all too often for our liking.

It is one of the most selfish of offences, because if the driver or passenger dies they will also most likely take another occupant of the vehicle with them, because inevitably that’s one of the first things they will hit as you fly across the vehicle interior following a collision. That person may be wearing their belt, but a head-butt from anywhere between 30 and 70mph impact speed is largely un-survivable. So from this point on take note that if someone in a vehicle you’re traveling in is not wearing their belt, they are quite willing to take your life as well as their own in the event of a collision, which is a little anti – social of them isn’t it !   But back to the point of this part of the blog, what is the reason to wear a belt that you never thought of? Well it comes back to selfishness, not at a personal level but at a social responsibility level, everyone doing their bit and all that, were all in this together, starting to sound like a coalition press release this isn’t it ! . Anyway think about this, the NHS and the emergency services are currently creaking following austerity measures, an ever rising population and ever greater demands for our skills. The NHS struggles to fund cancer treatments for children, find beds for the elderly, Ambulance crews struggle to make calls, we spend hours piecing together another fatal inquiry instead of chasing car thieves and burglars, all this after the fire service have cut free a corpse or the injured. Yet those selfish individuals who don’t wear a belt seem happy to burden us all with the injuries or tragic consequences they could avoid by wearing a belt. Remember those you could be denying help if you don’t wear your belt, you take their place in the queue, hardly fair is it.

And for those who fail to secure their children properly, we save a special sort of diplomacy, its professional, not all that polite but to the point, and always results in points, a fine or a court appearance.

I will just leave you with this little story, I once dealt with a man who didn’t wear his seatbelt, he was that incensed at being fined £60 (as it was then) he produced a fake doctors seatbelt exemption certificate at court, which was subsequently detected, the offender was duly given 6 weeks in prison, all for not wearing a seatbelt ! If you don’t want to wear one, get a pushbike, motorbike, get the bus, just stay out of motor vehicles, if you won’t wear a belt you really don’t belong in one. Wear your belt please, for the sake of everyone. seatbelts

We want traffic. We want traffic. We want traffic

We often get this call on our Twiitter feed from those who see our results in some areas and want us in their area helping solve the issues that they suffer with on a daily basis. If we could, we would love to be everywhere, but alas we are a small specialist unit who are placed into target areas, whether that’s to combat road born criminality or those who risk the lives of other road users through their below standard driving or riding. If you feel your area has a problem that needs addressing by the Traffic Department then your first port of call should be to contact your local neighbourhood team. Often they can resolve many issues without our specialist assistance, but if its beyond their area of expertise or it requires a higher impact resolution then they can in turn ask for the Traffic department to help. Just remember, it can be a double edge sword, I’ve often stopped vehicles on speed checks and in the middle of dealing with the offender had them say “ You won’t believe this, I was one of the people that complained, that’s why you are here”. Oh dear ……..   Until next time, Safe Journeys all.

To pursue or not to pursue, that is the question…

So as a real cynic of social media it took me some considerable time to grasp the power of this incredible, adaptable piece of IT and the importance that it now has in the policing arena. As one of the duty Sergeant’s for D unit I am regular “Tweeter” for the @TrafficWMP account and have really embraced the whole “Tweeting” thing. So when some of our traffic officers thought they might start writing the odd blog highlighting just what the Force Traffic Unit do, yes you guessed it that good old cynical me rears its head again. Turns out the blogs have been a hit and when @kerryblakeman asked for volunteers to write a blog I thought I’m gonna give that a go!

I warn you now I’m no Shakespeare, yet I start with a phrase that the bard famously penned; I’ve adapted it a little…

To pursue or not to pursue – that is the question?

As a PC some six years ago on the Traffic Department the privilege and excitement of driving fast powerful cars was really the reason for most being on the department. Yes of course we were all highly trained with Advanced driving grades, City and Guilds Vehicle Examiners qualifications and speed enforcement trained to name a few. We dealt with traffic legislation as part of our daily duties and of course tragically dealt with fatal Road Traffic Collisions and injury RTCs and provide Family Liaison to bereaved families. But to be behind that stolen vehicle (referred to as subject vehicle) or vehicle involved in crime that was failing to stop well it goes without saying, but I will…. The excitement, the passion, it was what the majority of traffic cops wanted to do, chase the baddie, arrest them and put them before the courts to face justice. I myself have had many pursuits as a PC the majority of which ended successfully with arrests and convictions at court, but clearly there are many dangers and grave circumstances when things go wrong.

Now some six years on as a supervisor I find myself more accountable, more answerable, a little heavier (only a bit honest) and a lot greyer! What do I think regarding pursuits? What do I do? And what should we as an organisation do? Here are some of my thoughts.

Force traffic officers in high speed response.When sat at my desk all a bit to frequent for my liking now I hear those four words broadcast over our radios. “Vehicle failing to stop.” My initial thoughts are to grab the nearest set of keys and go, go, go but then the supervisor in me takes over and dependant on the location I assess if I can realistically make the area and be of any tactical assistance.  If I’m not making I sit at the desk and listen intently to the commentary from the pursuing vehicle attempting to assess the emotions of the driver or passenger providing commentary. (WMP have clear guidelines and policies regarding pursuits that must be adhered to I’ll touch on these later). Knowing and supervising all of the officers on D unit I have a good understanding of all their characters and different tones in voices give me an idea of the mood in the police vehicle. So I sit in the office wishing it was me driving the police vehicle feeling that excitement and controlled adrenalin but then in a heartbeat I think of the potential outcomes and consequences of which there are many.

The one I fear the most is the RTC (road traffic collision). Who’s injured, is it a member of the public or one of my officers all of these thoughts rush through my head. WMP policy states that all police collisions (POLAC) have to be attended by a supervisor and this in itself can prove challenging, as I have to initiate an investigation against one of my officers. It could also be that should a breach of policy or traffic regulation be identified the officer may be grounded from driving and worst case, face a criminal prosecution. Should the latter be required it is dealt with by the Independent Police Complaints Commission and our Professional Standards Department to ensure transparency in case you were wondering.

During the pursuit our policies and procedures dictate that we must provide commentary and regular risk assessments. These should include reason for the pursuit, speeds, conditions to name just a few and that this is an ongoing assessment. All of our pursuit criteria is broadcast to the Force Contact Centre Inspector who based on commentary and many other factors decides whether the pursuit is Justifiable, Accountable, Proportionate, Accurate and Necessary (JAPAN).

If all of this is met the pursuit is authorised and the use of our tactics directory can commence. While in the tactical phase of the pursuit known as Tactical Pursuit & Containment all available traffic cars make towards the location to maximise our chances of bringing the pursuit to a safe conclusion and to catch the baddie!  Skills such as quartering, feeding and boxing all become available to utilise, there are many examples of TPAC which can be viewed on the World Wide Web an example of which is here.

As quickly as a pursuit can be authorised that authority can also be removed by the Force Contact Centre or indeed the officer(s) based on the risks being taken by the driver of the subject vehicle. So if you have ever been that member of the public pointing and shouting “The vehicles gone down there” and wondering why we’re not going after it, hopefully that should explain. To help inform part of our risk assessment we must have a working knowledge of the National Decision Model, link here should you fancy!

Force traffic officers in high speed response.

At the end of all pursuits we complete a pursuit de-brief and view the in car video footage that is available in the majority of all traffic vehicles. This helps us identify any areas of training or development required and of course is excellent evidence for the courts.

Now that you know a little around our pursuit policy and the calculated risks that officers take on a daily basis are you asking? Why do we do what we do, or should West Midlands Police pursue vehicles at all given the inherent dangers?  It is a real political and emotive subject I know but if WMP don’t pursue, what message are we sending to the criminal fraternity that use vehicles to commit crime and/or steal vehicles to fund a living?

All of the police forces across the United Kingdom are trained to the highest national level and tactics are approved by the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO). Pursuits have to be proportionate to the circumstances and all officers must be in appropriate vehicles and trained before any such authority is granted. This enables cross force pursuits to be successfully co-ordinated ensuring that all engaged during the pursuit have the same standard of training, with the ultimate aim being to bring the pursuit to a safe conclusion and deny criminals use of the roads. The greatest consideration is given during pursuits and public safety is a fundamental part of our decision making process and on-going risk assessment. Pursuits have significantly changed for the better over the last few years with training standardised across all forces for a collaborative approach. All officers are trained to the highest standards and use extreme professionalism when engaged in what can be a high speed chase. I can assure you the greatest consideration and thought process is made before broadcasting those words, vehicle failing to stop!

If you like my first attempt that’s great tell your friends and share the blog if not Tweet @kerryblakeman and tell him. He made me do it!

Sergeant Ade Brown